What’s more important to gamers in 2014: gameplay or story?

by Jayden Williams 21 Comments 16 Likes 8,705 Views 07/01/2014 Back to PS4 articles PlayStation 4

When you play video games, what drives your experience; your enjoyment? Is it the thrill of running and jumping through levels in amazing fashion, achieving a massive kill-streak in the latest online shooter, or is it being moved by an emotional story?

During my end-of-year break I tried to play as many different games as possible (mostly in a vain effort to reduce my increasing backlog). What I came to realise was how different they all were to one another, and you could effectively organise them all into two main categories: gameplay-driven and story-driven.

Such a concept isn’t entirely new, but it got me thinking - what’s most important to the modern day gamer?

Looking over the iGEA’s sales charts for the last few weeks of December, games from blockbuster franchises Call of Duty, Battlefield, FIFA and Need for Speed are common sights; games which can arguably be said to fit comfortably in the “gameplay” category - after all I can’t remember the last time someone said they play COD or Battlefield for their story elements.

Meanwhile on MMGN you guys, the community, voted sublime PlayStation 3 game The Last of Us as your Game of the Year for 2013, a game which is indeed heavy on the story (and feels). Sure the gameplay was enjoyable, but it was hardly compelling when you compared it to Joel and Ellie’s sweeping tale of survival. We only need to take a look at somewhat “flimsy” stealth-focused elements of the gameplay as a testament to how un-perfect The Last of Us in fact is.

But what do we mean when we say ‘gameplay-driven’ and/or ‘story-driven’; or should the question be, how do we differentiate between the two different types of experiences? Games like Super Mario 3D World, Forza 5 and Call of Duty: Ghosts could be considered gameplay-driven. All titles present the player with what we could arguably define as a narrative that the player progresses through by interacting with gameplay mechanics.

Let’s use Super Mario 3D World as an example to break it down a little. The main way we interact with Mario’s world is by navigating him through it by either walking, running or jumping; altered through the introduction of various gameplay mechanics. Our enjoyment from the game stems from our direct input with the controller, since we have total control over the actions of our digital avatar (Mario).

Call of Duty is an entirely different beast in the same category. Effectively a ‘military-simulator’, the franchise draws in millions of players into its online multiplayer modes for months on end; but why? It’s the gameplay mechanics - the attention to detail to the weight, handling of the guns, the ferocious war-tone action - that keeps us coming back for more. It’s also the social dynamic; playing with others that makes every snipe, every successful kill streak all the more rewarding.

On the other side of the spectrum we have heavy story-driven experiences like The Last of Us, Tell Tales’ The Walking Dead, The Wolf Among Us and to some extent, the Mass Effect saga. While each noted example does draw on gameplay (such is the nature of video games, after all), the appeal of each rests in the stories they have to tell.

Recently I (finally) played both The Wolf Among Us and The Walking Dead; both lean heavily on their respective narratives to draw in, and keep its player engaged. The Walking Dead is of especial mention as it kept me on the edge of my seat during its more tense moments, while every dialogue choice was made with heavy consideration and thought. Looking ahead to the other four episodes of season one, and the recently released opener for season two, it’s Lee and Clem’s story that will draw me back, not the unexciting point-and-click gameplay.

Now Mass Effect is an interesting advocate for story-driven games, since its gameplay has actually been quite well received. But its core foundation, Commander Shepard’s epic tale, which is the real reason for the series’ success. Over the course of three games, and a sizeable portion of downloadable content, we became emotionally invested in the lives, relationships and drama of the Normandy’s crew; many of whom will be fondly remembered by gamers for decades.

To wrap all of this up, let me say we shouldn’t be trying to discern what’s better - gameplay or story driven games - but what you personally enjoy more. There’s no right or wrong answer here; or no answer at all, you may simply enjoy consuming all types of gaming experiences, be it on console, PC or your smartphone.

What type of games do you more enjoy, gameplay or story driven? Share your opinion in the comments below!

Vote for this article Log in with Facebook

What’s more important to gamers in 2014: gameplay or story? Comments

  • maxiboy 34365 XP 07/01/2014
    I like story driven games generally but I do play many games based on their gameplay alone.
  • KezDaMuss 1327 XP 07/01/2014
    I love a good story but if you're going to be constantly frustrated with the gameplay, it's going to take you out of the story.

    I think Last Of US Gameplay was excellent...i remember so many tense moments. I remember one instance in particular in an abandoned museum when i had 1 shiv and an infected was walking past...it was about 2cm away and was sure i was going to be discovered...i remember sighing with relief as it walked by only for the thing to bolt around at the last minute and kill me.

    i think the heavy story really drew me into the game and made me enjoy it more.

    1 thing i admit is that it was almost emotionally tolling as sometimes I had to be in the mood to play it. Eg. if i wanted a quick bout, I'd play COD.

    I think we need a balance of both, but i would probably lean more towards gameplay. Because if a game has a bad story but good gameplay you can tough it out. If it has a good story and bad gameplay, you're just going to be frustrated and probably end up not finishing.
  • Leave your comment Log in with Facebook
  • crazynites 22585 XP 07/01/2014
    Generally gameplay driven but I'm enjoying this Contrast game which is story based for a change.
  • Jayden27 2272 XP 07/01/2014

    @KezDaMuss said:
    I think we need a balance of both, but i would probably lean more towards gameplay. Because if a game has a bad story but good gameplay you can tough it out. If it has a good story and bad gameplay, you're just going to be frustrated and probably end up not finishing.


    Very well put, and I find myself agreeing with you!

    I think DmC is another great example of a game with a lacklustre story, but solid gameplay. If it were the reverse, I think I would've not enjoyed it as much as I did.
  • SlappyWag 3862 XP 07/01/2014
    Both. I really enjoyed Tomb Raider, the story sucked me in and the gameplay had me loving it. Perfect match.
  • Elraro 37980 XP 07/01/2014
    Boobies.
  • Jayden27 2272 XP 07/01/2014

    @SlappyWag said: Both. I really enjoyed Tomb Raider, the story sucked me in and the gameplay had me loving it. Perfect match.


    I think that's a really good example of when both types of experiences, or rather what we feel we get out of our games, blends together perfectly.
  • Blob 40782 XP 07/01/2014
    Gameplay obviously. Couldn't give two shits about playing a game for the story if the gameplay is crap. I'd rather watch a movie and get an even better story.

    Mario, Zelda, Metal Gear Rising and Wonderful 101 are the best this year. The Last of Us? **** that noise.
  • espi_band 201 XP 07/01/2014
    I'm not speaking on behalf of all asians present in the world, but what I observed is in our part of the world, the game's storyline is more important (and more popular and enjoyable in our perspective) than real control over a character or gameplay. I know it doesn't make sense for a game but hey, Visual Novels and games that are full of dialogue boxes are selling well here so yeah. I guess it depends on your target consumers or buyers.

    @Elraro said: Boobies.

    and yeah, this.
    [MOG]
  • Jayden27 2272 XP 07/01/2014

    @espi_band said: I'm not speaking on behalf of all asians present in the world, but what I observed is in our part of the world, the game's storyline is more important (and more popular and enjoyable in our perspective) than real control over a character or gameplay. I know it doesn't make sense for a game but hey, Visual Novels and games that are full of dialogue boxes are selling well here so yeah. I guess it depends on your target consumers or buyers.



    Actually can see merit behind this. I remember playing the last HyperDimension game that came out locally, and was all "am I even playing this?!" I figured that it was a popular series for its story, and not its gameplay.
  • zurczner 8426 XP 07/01/2014
    Both. Sometimes the story line motivates you to enjoy the game more.
  • Jayden27 2272 XP 07/01/2014

    @zurczner said: Both. Sometimes the story line motivates you to enjoy the game more.


    Do you have an example of this? Interested in this.
  • zurczner 8426 XP 07/01/2014

    @Jayden27 said:

    @zurczner said: Both. Sometimes the story line motivates you to enjoy the game more.


    Do you have an example of this? Interested in this.


    Not really good at explaining stuff haha. But mainly for JRPGs, its about avenging a friend, protecting a love one, discovering the reason of a certain event. An example for me would be the ol' nintendo DS game "The World Ends With You". I'm not really much into that style of games at first, but because I really am curious about what will happen in the story, it made me grind and and collect things more even though the gameplay sometimes gets repetitive, knowing what happens next is just as satisfying and enjoyable. And also Bioshock Infinite, those collection of Voxophones that adds information about the back story of Columbia, Imagine if Bioshock Infinite has such a sucky storyline, I wouldn't even bother collecting more of those Vox or might not even consider finishing the game. (Unless I want a trophy)
  • milo 5185 XP 08/01/2014
    I love games with a good story, Beyond Two Souls, Last of Us, Uncharted 3 and Tomb Raider etc do it for me...
  • Ghosty 1200 XP 08/01/2014
    A lot of both, I still play CS 1.6 and Quake 3 (No CoD for me) to this day with thousand of hours logged into them which have no story aspect to them while I enjoy Walking Dead and Wolf Among Us which lack on gameplay as well.

    While some indies balance both of them and deliver well, see :Braid.
  • Gryllis 344432 XP 08/01/2014
    To be honest, I'm becoming less and less interested in story. I find myself saying I was glad I played Last of Us, but looking into it and realising the gameplay wasn't really all the fun. Then something like Beyond just looks horrible.

    But I used to be more into stories.

    I think I just want to get on with it now. I have access to a lot more games than I used to, so I don't want to waste time with too much story. In fact, I realised I wasn't paying attention to cutscenes in GTAV, so I just started skipping them, whereas I savoured ever second of San Andreas.

    I watch movies and TV shows and read books for story. 9/10 times, by the time I get to a game, I just want to get into the action. There's room for the occasional story-based game, but I definitely want that as the minority, with most gameplay based.
  • Mickyt888 47498 XP 08/01/2014
    Story. If gameplay and action is all that is needed. Then COD is prefect game?
  • Jayden27 2272 XP 11/01/2014

    @Gryllis said:
    I think I just want to get on with it now.


    Maybe you're just getting old, son :P

  • Tj866 498 XP 13/01/2014

    @Jayden27 said:

    @zurczner said: Both. Sometimes the story line motivates you to enjoy the game more.


    Do you have an example of this? Interested in this.


    Final Fantasy XIII
  • soofany05 250 XP 13/01/2014

    @Dusty Lids said: Story. If gameplay and action is all that is needed. Then COD is prefect game?


    It probably is for some people. It depends on what the customer is looking for in my opinion.
  • SlappyWag 3862 XP 16/01/2014

    Gryllis said: To be honest, I'm becoming less and less interested in story. I find myself saying I was glad I played Last of Us, but looking into it and realising the gameplay wasn't really all the fun. Then something like Beyond just looks horrible.
    But I used to be more into stories.
    I think I just want to get on with it now. I have access to a lot more games than I used to, so I don't want to waste time with too much story. In fact, I realised I wasn't paying attention to cutscenes in GTAV, so I just started skipping them, whereas I savoured ever second of San Andreas.
    I watch movies and TV shows and read books for story. 9/10 times, by the time I get to a game, I just want to get into the action. There's room for the occasional story-based game, but I definitely want that as the minority, with most gameplay based.



    I wish the cutscenes in Max Payne were skippable after the first playthrough. Ruined a great shooter after the first play.
Leave your comment Log in with Facebook